Protect your home and your family with these home safety tips.
"Fear is the father of courage and the mother of safety."
Henry H. Tweedy
Storm Protection
Storm Protection
How To Prevent A False Alarm
How To Prevent A False Alarm
Moving in: Security Checklist
Moving in: Security Checklist
Spot Deceptive Sales Scams
Spot Deceptive Sales Scams
Start a Neighborhood Watch Checklist
Start a Neighborhood Watch Checklist
Motion Sensor Tips and Tricks
Motion Sensor Tips and Tricks
Fire Safety Plan Checklist
Fire Safety Plan Checklist
5 Tips to Keep Your Child Safe at Home
5 Tips to Keep Your Child Safe at Home
Tips to Prevent a Home Break-In
Tips to Prevent a Home Break-In
Pet Safety Tips
Pet Safety Tips
Home Office Safety
Home Office Safety
Apartment and Condominium Safety
Apartment and Condominium Safety
Kitchen Safety Tips for the Holiday Season
Kitchen Safety Tips for the Holiday Season
Halloween Safety Tips for the Whole Family
Halloween Safety Tips for the Whole Family
Safety Solutions for Rural Properties
Safety Solutions for Rural Properties
Hurricane Safety
Hurricane Safety
Home Security Tips
Home Security Tips
Fire Safety Tips
Fire Safety Tips
Holiday Safety Tips
Holiday Safety Tips
Tips for a Safe Home during the Holidays
Tips for a Safe Home during the Holidays
Baby Safety Tips
Baby Safety Tips
Back To School Safety
Back To School Safety
Bicycle Safety Tips
Bicycle Safety Tips
How To Choose a Home Alarm System
How To Choose a Home Alarm System
College Safety Tips
College Safety Tips
College Social Life Safety
College Social Life Safety
Financial Safety Tips
Financial Safety Tips
Fire Safety For Kids
Fire Safety For Kids
Financial Scam Safety
Financial Scam Safety
Home Office Safety Tips
Home Office Safety Tips
Home Security Glossary
Home Security Glossary
Medicine Cabinet Safety
Medicine Cabinet Safety
School Lockdown Procedures
School Lockdown Procedures
Social Media Safety Tips
Social Media Safety Tips
Spring Break Safety Tips
Spring Break Safety Tips
Study Abroad Safety Tips
Study Abroad Safety Tips
Thanksgiving Safety Tips
Thanksgiving Safety Tips
Top Ten Guard Dogs
Top Ten Guard Dogs
4th of July Safety Tips
4th of July Safety Tips
Dating Safety Tips
Dating Safety Tips

Use these tips along with your home security system to help protect your home and your loved ones:

Create the illusion that someone is at your house. ...
Make sure all exterior doors have reliable locks. ...
Always look before opening the door. ...
Don't leave spare keys in obvious locations. ...
Secure your sliding glass doors. ...

Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home

Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home
In the kitchen
  • Keep a distance between flammable objects (papers, curtains, plastics, etc.) and fire sources (oven, stove top, portable heater, etc.)
  • Use harmful products (cleaning solutions, lighters) with caution (follow nstructions!) and keep them out of reach of children and pets.
  • Never leave sharp objects (knives) or other such tools and utensils misplaced or unattended.
  • Ensure electrical cords aren’t draped across other appliances or the counter or stove top.
  • Leave space around appliances for proper ventilation.
Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home
In the bathroom
  • Keep electrical appliances wrapped and away from water.
  • Use non-slip strips or floor mats
  • Always keep the room clean and as dry as possible.
Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home
In the bedroom
  • Never smoke.
  • As always, ensure that everything else is a safe distance away from a source of fire or heat.
  • Opt for mattresses with open flame-resistant protection.
  • You’re most vulnerable when you sleep. Even in bed, keep a phone, light, (and, if necessary, a weapon) within reach.
Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home
In the garage
  • This is probably where you store most of your tools and equipment. Take precautions with flammable liquids, chemicals, and anything producing fumes.
  • Keep poisonous substances (paint thinner, antifreeze, rat poison, etc.) locked up and out of reach of children and pets.
  • Keep your space clean and organized, especially as many of your tools are sharp, heavy or otherwise dangerous.
Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home
In the yard
  • Surround your property with a sturdy fence (this is more for keeping in children and pets, but can also serve to remind strangers to keep out).
  • If you’ve got a pool, keep it locked down or fenced in when not in use.
  • Be careful when working in bad weather. Use sand, salt, and good-traction footwear on ice and snow.
Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home
On the stairs
  • Keep steps clean and dry.
  • Always install stable and sturdy railing on both sides of the stairs.
  • Ensure that the distance between the rails is narrow enough to prevent a child or infant from falling through.
  • Good rule of thumb: less than four inches!
  • Keep stairs well lit.
Reducing Risk Inside and Around the Home
Guard against fire
  • Install smoke detectors, check them regularly, and replace the batteries at least once a year.
  • Avoid overloading outlets and extension cords.
  • Keep fire extinguishers handy and know how to use them.
  • Establish a safety exit, ensure all family members know and understand it, practice with drills, and ensure it’s never blocked.
  • Never block or pile things on heaters or near heat-exuding appliances; give these a wide berth, plenty of breathing room, and make sure they don’t get overheated.
  • Ensure that all materials are fire-resistant if you’re renovating or just fixing up something around the house.
  • Never leave any type of fire or hot appliance unattended.
  • Remove dry vegetation around your home, especially during the dry seasons.
  • Cover the fireplace with a stable and large metal fire frame.

Motorcycle Security – Protect Your Motorcycle

5 / 5 ( 1 vote ) If you’re like most motorcycle enthusiasts, you probably have put hundreds of hours into the care and maintenance of your bike. And while you likely want to protect your motorcycle as you would…

The post Motorcycle Security – Protect Your Motorcycle appeared first on Property Guard Master.


5 / 5 ( 1 vote ) If you’re like most motorcycle enthusiasts, you probably have put hundreds of hours into the care and maintenance of your bike. And while you likely want to protect your motorcycle as you would…

The post Motorcycle Security – Protect Your Motorcycle appeared first on Property Guard Master.

5 / 5 ( 1 vote )

If you’re like most motorcycle enthusiasts, you probably have put hundreds of hours into the care and maintenance of your bike.

And while you likely want to protect your motorcycle as you would any other asset, motorcycle security is a little different than keeping a vehicle secure. In this article, we’ll take you through some of the most reliable ways to protect your bike from theft.

Motorcycle Theft Prevention Tips

Since motorcycles are significantly lighter than cars, they’re a lot easier to steal. When a thief wants a motorcycle, the most common way to steal one is lifting it up into the back of a van or box truck. Ideally, your method of motorcycle security will prevent that from happening. Here are some of the ways you can keep your motorcycle protected from would-be thieves.

Keep Your Bike in the Garage

This answer may seem like an obvious one. After all, keeping your bike in the garage accomplishes a couple of objectives–it keeps your bike hidden from thieves, and it also makes it difficult for motorcycle thieves to simply lift up and take your bike.

Many crimes are crimes of opportunity–in this case, a thief who sees an unsecured motorcycle may simply take it because it’s easy.motorcycle security

That said, garages are not necessarily thief-proof. If a potential thief has seen your bike around and is making plans to steal it, they might not be deterred by a locked garage door.

Thieves who know what they’re doing can relatively easily break into a garage, especially if it’s a roll-up door with windows.

Windows make breaking in a bit easier, and they also might let potential thieves look inside and see your bike, making it a more likely theft target.

If you keep your bike garaged, you’ve already done a lot to keep it safe. But if theft is a concern, consider also using a ground anchor, chain, or other security method as well. Unless a thief is truly determined to steal your specific type of motorcycle, they likely won’t take on the challenge of breaking into a garage without being detected.

Use an Anchor

A motorcycle ground anchor works a lot like a bike rack, but it is usually more secure. A ground anchor is essentially a sturdy piece of material (usually metal) that can be bolted to the floor of your garage (or bolted to your driveway if you don’t have a garage).motorcycle security

Most anchors have a very durable hook or loop that your motorcycle can be chained to when not in use (check out our next section for advice on how to make it harder for thieves to cut through a chain lock).

Depending on the design, a ground anchor may be able to be folded down when not in use so it’s easier to drive over.

Anchors certainly aren’t the easiest motorcycle security method to use, and not everyone has a drill capable of drilling holes through concrete or asphalt in order to accommodate the bolts of an anchor.

However, if theft is a major concern (and if you want maximum peace of mind), it’s worth it to purchase and install a high-quality anchor. Certain types of anchors can also be placed under concrete, but unless you anticipate needing to re-pour concrete in the very near future, this type might not be too practical.

Use a Chain Lock

On its own, a motorcycle chain lock isn’t necessarily thief-proof. But like chain locks for bicycles, chain locks for motorcycles make theft a lot harder. Here are a few tips for keeping your bike extra secure with a chain lock (whether it’s chained to an anchor at home or to a bike rack when you’re on the go):

  • Keep the chain as tight as you can–Often, potential thieves will try to cut through a chain lock with an angle grinder or bolt cutter. The closer the chain is to your bike, the harder it is for thieves to cut through it without risking damage to the motorcycle.
  • Don’t let the padlock sit on the ground–Especially if there aren’t people around to see, some motorcycle thieves will use a sledgehammer to break open a padlock. If the bike is chained loosely enough that the padlock is on the ground, it’s especially easy for thieves to smash it with a hit or two. Ideally, try to keep the padlock up against your bike–motorcycle thieves want to preserve the value of whatever they steal, and they likely won’t smash the padlock if it means causing damage to a motorcycle.
  • Use a heavy chain–This one probably sounds obvious, but it’s still important. A lightweight chain will be extremely easy to cut through, making theft relatively effortless. A chain with thick, heavy links will be significantly harder to cut.
  • Don’t chain the front wheel–Just like with bicycles, it’s much easier to remove a motorcycle’s front wheel than it is to remove a rear wheel. If only the front wheel is chained, a thief can easily remove the wheel and take the rest of the bike.

Use a Disc Lock

The motorcycle disc lock is one of the most commonly used locks for a few reasons. To start, they're very portable--disc locks are designed to stop the wheels from turning, and many are small enough to fit into a pocket.

Some of them even come with an optional alarm feature, which adds an extra measure of security. As we mention in the next section, an alarm is guaranteed to stop a theft attempt, but most thieves prefer not to have attention drawn to them.

On its own, a disc lock may not be too effective. After all, especially if nobody is around, thieves can simply pick up your bike, toss it into a getaway vehicle, and drive away with it. And for an experienced motorcycle thief, breaking a disc lock can be relatively quick and easy.

Invest in a Motorcycle Alarm System

While an alarm system may not physically prevent someone from taking your motorcycle, they're designed to attract attention, which motorcycle thieves generally don't want. Especially if you know you'll be in earshot of your bike when the system is engaged, you'll likely be alerted in time to potentially stop an attempted theft.

If you're planning to rely on an alarm system alone to protect your motorcycle, though, you may want to consider pairing it with a heavy-duty chain lock. After all, when many people hear a car alarm, their reaction is simple annoyance. Especially in a very busy area, an alarm alone isn't a guarantee that bystanders will do anything to prevent a theft.

Set Up (and Advertise) Video Surveillance

Video surveillance on its own isn't enough to stop your motorcycle from being stolen. However, if your bike is removed from your property, a quality surveillance camera (especially one that is night-vision equipped) might be able to get a clear picture of the thief. motorcycle security

Some surveillance cameras can also send you motion alerts, which are especially useful when you're home. If an unexpected motion is recorded, you are immediately notified and can view live video.

Some cameras give you the option of contacting authorities if you see a thief while you aren't at home.

If you have surveillance cameras (and maybe even if you don't), it can be helpful to have a sign clearly indicating that the area is monitored by video surveillance. As you might expect, potential motorcycle thieves prefer to operate in an area where they're unlikely to be caught.

Unless they come prepared with masks or other ways to make them hard to identify, thieves are more likely to move on in search of an easier target.

Keep Your Bike Covered

Will a bike cover stop someone from stealing your motorcycle? Of course not. However, as we mentioned earlier, a decent proportion of crimes are crimes of opportunity. If a potential thief sees a valuable motorcycle, they might be motivated to try and steal it.

A cover means that potential thieves can't assess the value of your bike just by looking--for all they know, it could be a broken down project bike. Ideally, try to use this method alongside other security measures--a cover isn't necessarily a security measure, but it may serve as a deterrent.

Making the Decision

Motorcycle security is vitally important if you want to protect your investment. Ideally, you'll want to use more than one method of security. No means of securing your bike is 100% guaranteed, of course.

But by making it very difficult for someone to run off with your bike, you stand a much better chance of keeping it safe from theft. When you take a few simple measures to keep your prized possession safe from thieves, you can enjoy many more miles with your motorcycle.

The post Motorcycle Security – Protect Your Motorcycle appeared first on Property Guard Master.


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